Replacing a Toilet




This video was made in America a few years ago. The project is very similar in South Africa, except that the toilet outlet is toward the wall instead of into the floor (as it is in the USA). It’s not a difficult job, or as dirty a job as one may think. It is physically demanding though. However, my friend Jim was 72 at the time that he did the work, so as long as you’re fit……..

Modern toilets incorporate an “S”, “U”, “J”, or “P” shaped bend that causes the water in the toilet bowl to collect and act as a seal against sewer gases. With the onset of the industrial revolution and related advances in technology, the flush toilet began to emerge into its modern form. A crucial advance in plumbing, was the S-trap, invented by the Scottish watchmaker and mechanic Alexander Cummings in 1775, and still in use today. This device uses the standing water to seal the outlet of the bowl, preventing the escape of foul air from the sewer. His design had a sliding valve in the bowl outlet above the trap. Two years later, Samuel Prosser applied for a British patent for a “plunger closet”.

The term “water closet” was an early term for an interior or exterior room with a flushing toilet in contrast with an earth closet usually outdoors and requiring periodic emptying as “night soil”. Originally, the term “wash-down closet” was used. The term “water closet” was coined in England around 1870. It did not reach the United States until the 1880s. Around this time, only luxury hotels and wealthy people had indoor private bathrooms. By 1890 in the US, there was increased public awareness of the theory of disease and of carelessly disposed human waste being contaminated and infectious.

Originally, the term “bath-room” referred only to the room where the bathtub was located (usually a separate room not housing a toilet), but this connotation has changed in common North American usage. In the UK, the terms “bathroom” and “toilet” are used to indicate distinct functions, even though bathrooms in modern homes often include toilets. The term “water closet” was probably adopted because in the late 19th century, with the advent of indoor plumbing, a toilet displaced an early clothes closet, closets being renovated to easily accommodate the spatial needs of a commode.

Have a look at the video and send a link to all your friends to share the information.